EpicTable 2.0 Preview – Animated Token Bases

Posted in EpicTable Blog, EpicTable Development on April 22, 2017 at 1:04 pm

Any of you think you might be able to make use of animated token bases? Check this out:

These are, for the moment, rather non-trivial to create yourself, so I’d probably start with a gallery of them for different conditions that you could apply to a character…like…um…”on fire”? 😉 I don’t know, honestly, that fire is the ideal example. I think maybe flying and confused and entangled might be better examples of indicating character status in this way. But you’ve got to admit the fire looks cool. 😉

How would you guys see using this? Or do you? Right now, I think of it as a proof of concept that may or may not have a concrete use. Before you suggest it–because I know you are about to–the related feature that this enables, which I’m more sure will be useful, is animated spell effects. I’ve been looking at things like (to go all D&D on you for a second) Obscuring Mist and Entangle and a Pleasantly Roiling Darkness. As with all things EpicTable, I’m trying to give you a set of game-system-neutral components that you can use in any game you want, but where I know certain things are going to be useful because they appear commonly in certain games, I’m not above providing some pre-builds for them.


A Little Gratuitous and Unnecessary Background for the Insatiably Curious

EpicTable 2 represents a fairly major technological uplift relative to EpicTable 1. I created the first version of EpicTable when some tech that’s available now just wasn’t around or wasn’t ready. As new devices have entered the market, it’s pushed me to upgrade the technology underlying EpicTable. In some cases, the benefit is just that it handles new scenarios like large screens and high resolution displays better. That’s why I started with chat, by the way–at the time that was written, one had to do horrifying things to render dice and text together, and not only was the code complicated, but it just doesn’t work perfectly with some of your new displays. The additional benefit, though, is that the new tech opens up all kinds of possibilities, and it’s looking like the EpicTable 2 codebase is going to be significantly smaller and simpler. The core is the same–the way a dice roll or a character or a map is modeled is the same underneath–but the way it hits the screen and allows interaction is way, way, simpler.

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