(The Wait for) 4th Edition is the Best Thing to Happen to Gamers in a Long While

Posted in EpicTable Blog on April 25, 2008 at 12:18 am

 Dungeons and Dragons 4th Edition was announced last GenCon, and since then, both game vendors and purchasers have been reluctant to put money into a to-be-obsolete game system. The roleplaying game industry has come to a standstill…. Or has it?

…continue reading (The Wait for) 4th Edition is the Best Thing to Happen to Gamers in a Long While


Virtual Tabletops are More Than Maps

Posted in EpicTable Blog on March 27, 2008 at 12:02 am

Armored man fighting a giant troll Virtual tabletops—my own EpicTable included—tend to put the spotlight on maps. Most (probably all) virtual tabletops provide a lot more than maps. There’s chat, character sheets, rules automation, and various kinds of media that a GM can send to the players…but still, a lot of the focus is on maps.

I’ve said to myself all along that there are other aspects of the gaming experience that are important—especially to the more story-oriented crowd, and I’ve imagined EpicTable following the roleplay vector more than the wargame vector over the next several years. Don’t get me wrong—I think maps are important, and I’m a long-time D&D player, so I’m not throwing away my battlemat anytime soon…but I had an interesting couple of experiences this week that put virtual tabletops into a little bit different perspective for me. …continue reading Virtual Tabletops are More Than Maps


Living Legends

Posted in EpicTable Blog on February 6, 2008 at 8:05 pm

Legends aren’t just for long-dead heroes and villans. You can make your world more real to the players and take some of the sting out of a character death by incorporating legends about the characters’ deeds into your current campaign. …continue reading Living Legends


Virtual Tabletops and In-Character/Out-of-Character Speech

Posted in EpicTable Blog on February 1, 2008 at 7:58 pm

chat bubbles This post presents some ideas for separating player speech from character speech when playing roleplaying games on a virtual tabletop.

Around your kitchen table, it’s probably obvious when you’re talking vs. when your character is talking. Especially if you’re that guy who always plays a gnome or a halfling and has to stay in character all the time. (You know who you are. Stop it.) When your group moves to a virtual tabletop, though, you need a new way to keep track of who’s saying what. …continue reading Virtual Tabletops and In-Character/Out-of-Character Speech


  • Tags